Four South African heritage sites to visit

Spring Travel Heritage Month Bucket List

Warmer days are upon us and travel is on the cards! Start the spring season by celebrating South Africa’s beauty this Heritage Month. One of the country’s best traits is its beautiful weather, so break out of winter hibernation and say hello to sunny blue skies.   Many spring festivals and tours have been cancelled this year due to the pandemic, but there are still many opportunities to take your car out for a drive on the open road. This month we feature four must-do South African travel destinations.     Mapungubwe National Park – Limpopo     Once the capital of a flourishing kingdom and thriving trade centre between Egypt, Persia, China, and India,  Mapungubwe became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2004. Likely the earliest known sites in southern Africa and containing important archaeological treasures, it speaks of 50,000 years of human history and development. Mapungubwe is testimony to the fact that a complex and sophisticated African civilisation flourished before colonisation.    Some activities include a visit to the Treetop walkway, go game and bird viewing, climb 147 steps to the Lost City on top of Mapungubwe Hill and learn about the ancient culture, drive the Tshugulu Eco Route, view enormous baobab trees and red rock formations.     Cederberg Mountains – Western Cape     The Cederberg is the home of the now world-famous rooibos (red bush) tea, but lesser-known and experienced are the dramatic silhouettes carved by the nature over millennia.    The area’s dry sunny climate makes it ideal for bouldering, which is also popular among international visitors. Bouldering is a form of rock climbing without the use of climbing aids like ropes and harnesses. For something more down-to-earth, explore South Africa’s heritage by taking in the delicate beauty of ancient San rock art.      Namaqualand & Richtersveld – Northern Cape     From a wilderness of barren landscape to splashes of splendour in the form of flora, this miraculous sight occurs over less than two months of the year. ‘Flower Tours’ are extremely popular and must be booked many months in advance. However, you can book your own accommodation in places like Port Nolloth or Springbok and take a self-drive down south.   Just over two and a half hours away from either Port Nolloth or Springbok is the Richtersveld Transfrontier National Park, unique and magical in its own right. A Unesco World Heritage Site, the area stretches from Namibia to the northwestern part of South Africa – 6,000 square kilometres of rich botanical biodiversity and fascinating geology. If you prefer something more adventurous and off-the-beaten-track, Richtersveld won’t disappoint.      Baviaanskloof Nature Reserve – Eastern Cape     The vast rugged mountain kingdom of ‘Valley of the Baboons’ offers a unique wilderness experience of stunningly beautiful landscapes comprised of colourful cliffs and rock formations. Its rich and diverse animal life includes leopard, buffalo, kudu, zebra, hartebeest, buck, and of course, baboon.   The Baviaanskloof is an ecologically sensitive area and offers outdoor lovers a range of recreational activities such as mountain hiking, rock and mountain climbing, camping, wildlife photography, bird watching, cycling, and more.   Good to know   A number of these locations can get quite rugged and driving through some areas require a sturdy 4x4. If you plan to do a lot of country driving, it’s a good idea to consider vehicle insurance and maintenance cover products – these can offer peace of mind so that you can go ahead and enjoy your drive minus the worry.   Are any of these on your bucket list? Wherever you decide to go next, travel with mindfulness like the Bushmen thousands of years ago and tread lightly on the land. We need to preserve as much of the country’s natural beauty as possible so that future generations can enjoy it too. Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints.      Disclaimer: This information is for educational, or entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree. 
Transparent car and suspension parts – 3d illustration
3 Things You Didn't Know About Shock Absorbers
Shock absorbers are a part of a car’s suspension system. Hidden beneath a car's wheel arches, they are out of plain sight, resulting in most car owners forgetting to check or maintain them. Inexperienced drivers often don’t even realise that they would need checking or replacing.   What is shocking is that most people are not aware of the danger of worn shocks and the safety risk they place themselves, their passengers, and other road users in.    What do shocks do? For starters, it may come as a shock to most of us that shock absorbers themselves do not absorb shocks. This is the function of the spring.    The function of shock absorbers is to stop a car from bouncing up and down and does this by transferring the spring energy to the piston. This keeps the car’s tyres in constant contact with the road – an important safety feature because as a car turns corners or brakes to a stop, the shocks enable all of the four tyre’s to stay gripped to the surface. This is why when your shocks are worn you experience a rougher ride.    Regardless of how new or how much tread your tyres may be, they will not be effective on their own when confronted with an emergency situation. Further risks associated with worn shocks could be: Less ability to brake efficiently Increased risk of skidding on wet surfaces Less ability to control during cornering or crosswinds Increase of tyre wear and suspension components Poor handling and control Are shocks and struts the same thing?  Shock absorbers and struts both give you a smoother ride on the road, but they function differently. Depending on your vehicle it can have either or both components.    These are a few of the key differences: Shock absorbers  Keeps your car from bouncing up and down Secures the suspension to the car and controls vibration Ensures stability for a more comfortable ride Are relatively simple to replace Struts  Supports the weight of a vehicle Maintains a vehicle’s alignment – essential to steering Is mounted to the chassis of a vehicle  Are a vital structural part of the suspension system Is mounted on the coil spring which maintains the height of the vehicle Are relatively complicated and potentially hazardous to replace  Have a longer lifespan   3 important things to know about shocks It’s the spring that absorbs actual shocks to the vehicle, the shocks help dampen them. While shocks and struts both provide a similar purpose, they are two very different types of components that perform in a different manner.   Driving with worn shocks can place your life in danger. If you start experiencing a bumpier ride or your car leaning more when turning corners, please have them checked by a professional.     What to do when shocks are worn Like any component in your car, shock absorbers deteriorate over time with normal wear and tear. However, road conditions play a big role in how much and how fast they deteriorate. Potholes impact the condition of your shocks as well as other parts of the car, and dirt, dust, mud, and other road debris can cause further damage.    If your shocks need replacing, check whether the component is within the car’s warranty period. If the warranty has expired before the next service is due, visit a reputable auto fitment centre who complies with the RMI (Retail Motor Industry) code of conduct.    A mechanical breakdown cover such as Auto Pedigree’s Component Cover can help protect against the cost of labour and parts incurred by a mechanical and electrical failure. Find out more about mechanical breakdown warranty when you buy a quality used car from Auto Pedigree – contact us on 010593 9505.   Disclaimer: This information is for educational, or entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree.
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Four South African heritage sites to visit
Spring Travel Heritage Month Bucket List
Warmer days are upon us and travel is on the cards! Start the spring season by celebrating South Africa’s beauty this Heritage Month. One of the country’s best traits is its beautiful weather, so break out of winter hibernation and say hello to sunny blue skies.   Many spring festivals and tours have been cancelled this year due to the pandemic, but there are still many opportunities to take your car out for a drive on the open road. This month we feature four must-do South African travel destinations.     Mapungubwe National Park – Limpopo     Once the capital of a flourishing kingdom and thriving trade centre between Egypt, Persia, China, and India,  Mapungubwe became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2004. Likely the earliest known sites in southern Africa and containing important archaeological treasures, it speaks of 50,000 years of human history and development. Mapungubwe is testimony to the fact that a complex and sophisticated African civilisation flourished before colonisation.    Some activities include a visit to the Treetop walkway, go game and bird viewing, climb 147 steps to the Lost City on top of Mapungubwe Hill and learn about the ancient culture, drive the Tshugulu Eco Route, view enormous baobab trees and red rock formations.     Cederberg Mountains – Western Cape     The Cederberg is the home of the now world-famous rooibos (red bush) tea, but lesser-known and experienced are the dramatic silhouettes carved by the nature over millennia.    The area’s dry sunny climate makes it ideal for bouldering, which is also popular among international visitors. Bouldering is a form of rock climbing without the use of climbing aids like ropes and harnesses. For something more down-to-earth, explore South Africa’s heritage by taking in the delicate beauty of ancient San rock art.      Namaqualand & Richtersveld – Northern Cape     From a wilderness of barren landscape to splashes of splendour in the form of flora, this miraculous sight occurs over less than two months of the year. ‘Flower Tours’ are extremely popular and must be booked many months in advance. However, you can book your own accommodation in places like Port Nolloth or Springbok and take a self-drive down south.   Just over two and a half hours away from either Port Nolloth or Springbok is the Richtersveld Transfrontier National Park, unique and magical in its own right. A Unesco World Heritage Site, the area stretches from Namibia to the northwestern part of South Africa – 6,000 square kilometres of rich botanical biodiversity and fascinating geology. If you prefer something more adventurous and off-the-beaten-track, Richtersveld won’t disappoint.      Baviaanskloof Nature Reserve – Eastern Cape     The vast rugged mountain kingdom of ‘Valley of the Baboons’ offers a unique wilderness experience of stunningly beautiful landscapes comprised of colourful cliffs and rock formations. Its rich and diverse animal life includes leopard, buffalo, kudu, zebra, hartebeest, buck, and of course, baboon.   The Baviaanskloof is an ecologically sensitive area and offers outdoor lovers a range of recreational activities such as mountain hiking, rock and mountain climbing, camping, wildlife photography, bird watching, cycling, and more.   Good to know   A number of these locations can get quite rugged and driving through some areas require a sturdy 4x4. If you plan to do a lot of country driving, it’s a good idea to consider vehicle insurance and maintenance cover products – these can offer peace of mind so that you can go ahead and enjoy your drive minus the worry.   Are any of these on your bucket list? Wherever you decide to go next, travel with mindfulness like the Bushmen thousands of years ago and tread lightly on the land. We need to preserve as much of the country’s natural beauty as possible so that future generations can enjoy it too. Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints.      Disclaimer: This information is for educational, or entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree. 
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Car key with notebook calculator and pocket money on table
The Basics of Vehicle Instalments 
Looking to finance a vehicle? If so, there are a few things you need to know. Before you start your search for a new or second-hand car, the first thing to consider is how much you can afford to pay towards purchasing one. It’s also important to account for other vehicle expenses such as car insurance, which comes with its own set of premiums.    Unless you’re buying a car cash, there are two important affordability questions to ask yourself: What lump sum amount can I pay upfront as a deposit? How much can I afford on a monthly basis?   Other than knowing what your budget is, is understanding the length of period you will be paying off the loan, in order to calculate what the monthly instalment will be.   Finance periods The finance term is agreed to upfront and can range from 12 to 72 months or even more. This equates to 1 to 6+ years. The longer the finance term, the less your monthly instalments will be, but bear in mind that while it looks good in the short term, you’ll have to pay interest on the loan. This means you’ll actually end up paying a lot more for the vehicle once you’ve finally finished paying it off.  What if I can’t pay? Of course, a lengthy payment term poses a fair amount of risk because nothing in life is guaranteed – being able to maintain a job depends on it. If you’re unable to continue with your monthly payments, the bank may agree to freeze your instalments for a short time to help you get back on your feet. Failing to pay thereafter will be seen as a breach of contract and your car will be repossessed.  This doesn’t mean you may stop paying – the bank will still expect the balance of the cost after the car has been resold (shortfall), along with other charges.  Do I still have to pay if I have an accident or the car is stolen? Things can get complicated here. If the car is considered a write-off or stolen you may still need to continue paying instalments for a period of time. How much and for how long depends on the type of insurance you have, how long you’ve had the car for, and other variables that you will need to speak to your insurance company about.    Loan calculations In order to figure out the exact instalment amount to be paid monthly, the bank or finance institution will take the price of the vehicle, subtract the deposit amount you put down (in some cases required to secure the vehicle), and calculate the instalments based on the finance period.   To get a rough idea for yourself, you can use an online calculator – most of the major banks and financial institutions have one such as Absa and Westbank. These are easy to use and Standard Bank’s calculator has a handy Affordability calculator as well.  To calculate you will need to input: The total purchase price of the vehicle including VAT and optional extras. The deposit amount that you want to put in.   This will give you a good idea of what you can expect to pay every month according to the loan term you selected. Other useful information offered is how much interest you’ll pay for the term and the total cost of the vehicle after interest and fees. This helps you choose a payment plan that suits your pocket and situation.   Here’s an example: What is a balloon payment? After scrutinising the example above, you may be wondering about balloon payments. This is basically a substantially larger sum that is paid at the end of the loan period, the purpose being to reduce the initial instalment amounts. Therefore, they are just different ways of spreading the cost.    A balloon payment option is only available for shorter-term loans and best for those with a good amount of savings and is secure in their income stream.   Now that you have a better understanding of instalments you can make better-informed decisions about financing a vehicle. If you have any further questions, contact Auto Pedigree – we also have financial arrangements with all major banks in South Africa and can help you find the best package for your needs.     Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree. 
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 Shiny powder blue VW Beetle
The Volkswagen Beetle in SA – 1951 to 1979
How many people can you fit into a bug? Not just any bug, a VW Bug. This was a thing back in the 60s when the Beetle was the car to own and people thought cramming themselves into small spaces was fun. This is the playful appeal of the lovable little car, and why we are proud as South Africa to have played a part in manufacturing this classic icon.   Why the Beetle is the original “People’s Car” As the first Volkswagen ever designed and produced, the VW Beetle is one of the greatest automotive icons of the 20th century. First manufactured in 1938 in Germany, it was given many fond nicknames across the world – named in its home country as the “beetle”, in France as the “ladybug”, and in Nigeria as the “tortoise car”.    During the 60s and the hippie era, the car represented a symbol of personal freedom and often seen painted with colourful patterns and graphic images, but perhaps the most popular was the daisy, a flower that symbolised peace and love. No other car could represent or sport these two traits better than the Beetle.    Made in SA – 69 years ago   August 31, 1951 – a historic date for Volkswagen South Africa. 69 years ago the first VW Beetle rolled off the assembly line in Uitenhage, Port Elizabeth.  For 28 years since then until the end of production in 1979 – 290,000 Beetles were sold in South Africa. During this time, it was the top-selling vehicle in the country for 11 years.    1951 to 1952 – Split window. Very few of the first-generation VW Beetles were built, making them extremely rare. They are known as ‘split-window’ referring to the small rear windscreen that is divided into two windows. 1953 to 1957 – Oval window. A small oval-shaped rear windscreen replaces the split window and the engine size is increased to 1200.  1958 – Larger rear windscreens still sporting the pop-out indicators or ‘semaphores’. 1958 to 1965 – the classic 1200 model. They consisted of rounded bumpers and railings. 1966 – enter the 1300 models.  1967 – the 1500 model when for a short period of the year Beetles in South Africa were manufactured with disc brakes and flat hubcaps, making it one of the country’s rarest Beetles. 1968 to 1970 – newer 1500 models with smaller taillights and flat-pressed bumpers. 1970 – the production of 1300 and 1600 models with large round taillights. The 1600S also featured curved windshields and a new dashboard, and later models fitted with red tartan upholstery.  1978 – 1600 models were phased out leaving only the 1300 model in production. 1979 – in January of this year the last Beetle rolled off the South African production line, heralding out a period of automotive history.    With 21,529,464 produced, the Beetle is the longest-running and most-manufactured car of a single platform ever made.   Launched in the 50s in South Africa, infused into South African driving culture into the 70s shaping the memories of generations, the VW will always be fondly remembered as the People’s Car and a part of South African heritage.   Volkswagen South Africa "Memories" TV ad     So How Many People Can Fit Into a Beetle?    Twenty. According to the Guinness World Record, in 2010, twenty university students piled into an old 60s Beetle in order to bring attention to human trafficking. Volkswagen – a true people’s car!   Disclaimer: This information is for entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree.
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Online credit card purchase
Fraud Alert! Car Sale Scams
Warning: Please do not make any payment transactions to purchase a vehicle before ensuring it is from a trusted source.   Many people have fallen victim to second-hand car scams by fraudsters falsely portraying themselves as legitimate car dealers – particularly on Facebook’s Marketplace platform. Sadly, it’s extremely difficult to track these criminals and the unfortunate victims never recover their money.   Avoid being taken for a ride by unscrupulous car sellers and don’t fall victim to internet scams when looking to buy a car. Use this information to safeguard yourself and help you make an informed decision before you buy.   How you are scammed   There are a variety of ways that fraudsters operate, and one of the most popular platforms is Facebook Marketplace. Scammers either pose as private sellers or auto dealers. This is how a fake car dealer offer generally plays out:   The fraudster creates pages of a fake dealership that look legitimate by stealing the dealership’s name and logo. These pages are not around for long, and the so-called dealership’s website doesn’t exist. A fake advert shows up for a vehicle that looks like a really good deal. The car looks immaculate and the price too good to be true. You show interest and are prompted to make a deposit in order to: a). Secure the vehicle, and b). Indicate that you’re serious about the purchase. If you have been scammed on Facebook Marketplace, this is Facebook’s advice: “…you can report the seller to us in Marketplace. To do that, visit the seller's profile, which can be found at the bottom of the product profile. Tap on the “Seller Info” section, and there you'll find a “Report” button. Facebook will review the case.”   However, in many cases, the fraudster deletes their account before anyone notices they have been scammed, or anything can be done about it.   How to spot a scam   Finding a good car deal these days also means you need to be able to tell whether you’re dealing with a legitimate car dealer. Before going any further and wasting your time, first look for these suspicious signs:   Images are of a good-looking car with unbelievably good prices. These images are generally stolen from the real dealership’s pages or website. The ‘seller’ asks for payment before you even get to see or test drive the car. In this case, you should leave the conversation immediately. The ‘seller’ won’t meet you in person to show you the car. The ‘seller’s’ Facebook personal profile looks suspiciously empty. This is a good sign that it is a fake account. The website address provided is fake. If the website address does exist, verify the vehicle on the website – if it isn’t there, it might be a fake deal. The ‘seller’ asks for payment via PayPal or similar where payments cannot be reversed. Ways to Check that You’re Dealing with Auto Pedigree   While it may be easy to fall victim of fraud, it’s just as easy to prevent yourself from being swindled of your hard-earned money. There are many fake deals on Facebook Marketplace misrepresented as Auto Pedigree. Please be vigilant, check the details and follow these rules:   Always ensure that the website address is https://www.autopedigree.co.za/ – anything after the ‘www’ must only read ‘autopedigree.co.za’ and not anything else such as ‘autopedigreemotors.co.za’ or ‘auto-pedigree.co.za’, etc. Auto Pedigree has one customer call centre contact number: 010 593 9505. We do not use private cell phone numbers. Our email address is webinfo@autopedigree.co.za. Our official Facebook page is facebook.com/autopedigree. We do not and will not list and sell cars from the Facebook Marketplace. If you suspect or have fallen victim to fraud through a fake Auto Pedigree deal, please report it to us by calling 010 593 9505 or emailing webinfo@autopedigree.co.za.   Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information.
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Cars and trucks driving on country highway.
Smart Ways Drivers Can Reduce Their Carbon Footprint
International Mother Earth Day occurs on the 22 April every year, when we remind ourselves of the pollution our cars emit and the effects it has on our future generations.    ‘Carbon’ is essentially a word we use to mean greenhouse gas emissions comprising CO2, methane, nitrous oxide and other toxic gases. These are released into the atmosphere in the various types of human activities and driving a car is just one of them.    CO2 and cars – Facts & figures Here are some CO2 figures from various sources (no figures were found or available for South Africa): Whether your vehicle is old or new, for each litre of petrol a car consumes, approximately 2.3kg of CO2 is produced.  For each litre of diesel a car consumes, approximately 2.7kg of CO2 is produced.  An average car emits about 6 tons of carbon dioxide every year.  In Europe, passenger cars account for approximately 61% of total CO2 emissions from road transport. In the US, driving accounts for 47%.    Note: The more economical your vehicle, the less CO2 it will produce. Bear this in mind when looking for your next second-hand car.    Ways to reduce CO2 emissions from your car Since we are so dependent on our cars to get around, we need to think of ways and take extra steps to reduce our impact on the environment. To begin with, calculate the CO2 created by your vehicle, then make use of the following tips:   Drive smartly  Not in a suit, but by adopting smooth driving habits, not stop-starts and heavy braking. Hard acceleration and braking can lower mileage by between 15 - 30% on the highway and 10% to 40% in heavy traffic. (Source: US Department of Energy) Try to idle as little as possible. Switch off rather than keep the engine running unnecessarily.  Speed matters. More speed increases aerodynamic drag and use more fuel. Studies show that for every 8km you drive over 96 km per hour (approximate figures), fuel economy is lowered by 7%. Carpool – Share rides rather than drive solo.  Regular car maintenance  Proper tyre inflation can improve your mileage significantly. Regular car services that clean or replace your air and oil filters can reduce your fuel consumption. Keep your engine tuned – some maintenance adjustments can increase fuel efficiency by up to 40%. Choose economy over looks – It’s worth mentioning again, that the more economical your vehicle, the better its fuel efficiency, and therefore the lower the CO2 emissions. Consider weight – When looking for a new second-hand car, consider that a lighter vehicle requires less energy to power it on.  Consider shape – When looking for your next second-hand car, bear in mind its aerodynamics and wind resistance factor.    We cannot stop our vehicles from emitting CO2, but we can take simple steps to increase fuel efficiency. The advantages are tenfold. Safer driving, money-saving, and planet-friendly.  Disclaimer: This information is for educational, or entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree.
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6 Best Ways to Reduce Your Credit Score
Ways to Improve Your Credit Scores
For most of us, buying a used car means having to apply for a vehicle finance. The higher your credit score, the better your chances of a bank or financial institution granting you the loan. A higher score also means you’ll qualify for better interest rates, saving you a fair amount of money.    If your credit score is lower than the average range of around 600, you may want to take steps to improve it to reach 700 and above. Improving your score does take time, but don’t let this put you off – the sooner you start taking steps towards improving the faster they will increase.    To begin with, read our Guide to Credit Scores and Where to Check Your Credit Scores. This will help you understand which factors are negatively impacting your scores and what you need to do. These are some of the key factors to look into that may help you improve your credit score:   Pay your bills on time   Every monthly account or expense you have, such as rent, student loan, credit card, water and lights, phone, etc. should be paid by the due date. Setting up debit orders are a convenient way to ensure you don’t forget. A late payment affects your credit history as do missed payments.    Pay your credit cards off each month    Paying the full amount you spent in that month by the due date every month is key to building a good credit score. This shows responsible and reliable credit habits.    Reduce your debt   Pay off any past balances you owe – especially larger balances, which will make a more positive impact on your credit score than paying off smaller balances.    Keep your credit card spend low   Try to use as little as your available credit as possible. This indicates that you have sensible spending habits and good money management.    Keep new credit applications low   Don’t apply for too many new accounts over a short period of time.    Pay your bills every two weeks   If you can afford to, pay your accounts more than just once in a month. This will reduce your credit utilisation and improve your credit score.   In summary These are a number of tips that could help you boost your credit score. Once you’re in the desired score range, follow and maintain two basic rules: Pay your bills in full and on time every month, and keep your credit card balances low. This should go a long way to getting closer to your goal of obtaining vehicle finance for your next quality used car.    Also read:  Guide to Credit Scores Where to Check Your Credit Scores     Disclaimer: This information is for educational, or entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree.
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3 tips to lower vehicle depreciation with depreciation graph
How Does Vehicle Depreciation Work
What Is Vehicle Depreciation? In short, depreciation is the decline in the value of a vehicle from the time you bought it. It is the difference between the purchase price and the selling price. Not all cars have the same rate of depreciation but most cars depreciate at a rate of about 15 – 30% a year. However, the first year of ownership accrues the highest rate and decreases as the car gets older. In general, you can expect your vehicle to halve in value after five years of owning it.   Asset Or Liability? Certain purchases we make accrue in value with time. They either improve with age or they become more sought after, therefore making them assets. Unfortunately, your vehicle can only be classified as an asset if its current value is greater than what you owe on it, and even then, it is a depreciating asset.  This means the car loses value the moment you drive it away from the dealer.    In addition to this, owning a car comes with ongoing expenses such as fuel, insurance, maintenance, and repairs. Which is why it is more often considered a liability than an asset.   What Affects A Car’s Depreciation Rate? The following factors will increase the rate of depreciation: Condition – Any damage or wear and tear Mileage – A high odometer reading Warranty – A short warranty period Service – An incomplete history Reputation – Cars believed to be unreliable Ownership – Too many previous owners Age – Older models Economy – High fuel consumption Size – Big luxury cars with higher expenses Demand – Low demand, high supply Modifications – Spoilers and other non-standard fittings   How To Beat Vehicle Depreciation Depreciation is inevitable, but since owning a vehicle is mostly a necessity in South Africa, we can try to minimise the effects. Especially if you’re buying a used car, begin by choosing a quality used car that will hold its value. Take heed of the list above and then consider the following: Buy as new as possible with the lowest mileage. Avoid outrageous shades -neutral colours stay popular for longer. Features such as central locking, safety, air conditioning, CD/MP3 player, etc. improve resale value. Service regularly. Maintain and keep the body in good condition.  In general, it makes sense to buy a quality used vehicle with low mileage. But this becomes even more important when you begin to consider depreciation values and what your vehicle will end up being worth when you eventually decide to sell it. That is why Auto Pedigree offers more than 4,000 low-kilometre, quality used cars with full-service history and 116-point quality check.   Read next: Will Your Car Pass the Inspection Test? Looking for a Low Mileage Used Car to Buy? Buying a Used Car From Auto Pedigree     Disclaimer: This information is for educational, or entertainment purposes only. It must not be construed as advice, legal, financial, or otherwise. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. The views and opinions are those of the author and not necessarily those of Auto Pedigree.    
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